threads

  no. 5 thread

no. 5 thread

  stitching with rayon yarn from habu textiles

stitching with rayon yarn from habu textiles

I am not a traditional quilter by any means. My stitches don't look the same on the back as on the front and although I admire the tiny stitches that signifies quality hand quilting, it is not an art that I have mastered. I am more of a meandering hand stitcher, inspired by japanese stitching techniques such as sashiko and boro. I make lines and paths to blend the surface of my work.

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  no. 5 thread dyed with onion skins and dandelion 

no. 5 thread dyed with onion skins and dandelion 

I love to use substantial thread to give each mark more weight and meaning. My absolute favorite is thread no 5, from Beautiful Silks in Australia. This is a 4-ply, 70% silk and 30% cotton thread which was introduced to me by India Flint, during a class I took with her a few summers ago. The no. 5 thread is strong and can be separated into finer strands for more delicate work. It has a beautiful off-white color, and it dyes wonderfully. This thread is now sold in the US by Christine Mauersberger, through her online store Hank & Spool. I buy it in large hanks, either winding it up in a ball or cutting it in half for the perfect stitching length. 

  rayon yarn from habu textiles

rayon yarn from habu textiles

  knk silk thread

knk silk thread

There are other threads I like to use, such as KNK Japanese silk thread, it has a wonderful sheen and comes in a wide range of color, although none of them created with natural dyes. I also like the black rayon yarn from Habu textiles that I got from a local yarn store a few years back. I love to use vintage threads and am always on the lookout for them when I travel, especially in Europe. When working with vintage threads it is important to check that it is strong and not deteriorated, to make sure your stitches will hold up over time.

  vintage cotton thread, intended for repair of British uniforms during world war II.

vintage cotton thread, intended for repair of British uniforms during world war II.

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